hMMMM
Classiest afternoon breakfast for our last day in this crappy apartment. Homemade by @samehzorz #soprochefonal

Classiest afternoon breakfast for our last day in this crappy apartment. Homemade by @samehzorz #soprochefonal

I love little birdies taken baths!

I love little birdies taken baths!

mothernaturenetwork:

All you have to do is watch this video and you can help save homeless puppiesPet food company offers to share viral videos profits with dogs in need.

mothernaturenetwork:

All you have to do is watch this video and you can help save homeless puppies
Pet food company offers to share viral videos profits with dogs in need.

@letlovelightlife Like this one? What is it!? It’s so pretty.

@letlovelightlife Like this one? What is it!? It’s so pretty.

All I need now is @samehzorz and the night off. K. Thx.

All I need now is @samehzorz and the night off. K. Thx.

More from my pre-work adventures.

More from my pre-work adventures.

sillyboys-girlsareforgirls:

sh1re:

happy easter

I’m so done

distant-traveller:

Airglow, gegenschein, and Milky Way

As far as the eye could see, it was a dark night at Las Campanas Observatory in the southern Atacama desert of Chile. But near local midnight on April 11, this mosaic of 3 minute long exposures revealed a green, unusually intense, atmospheric airglow stretching over thin clouds. Unlike aurorae powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, the airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction, and found around the globe. The chemical energy is provided by the Sun’s extreme ultraviolet radiation. Like aurorae, the greenish hue of this airglow does originate at altitudes of 100 kilometers or so dominated by emission from excited oxygen atoms. The gegenschein, sunlight reflected by dust along the solar system’s ecliptic plane was still visible on that night, a faint bluish cloud just right of picture center. At the far right, the Milky Way seems to rise from the mountain top perch of the Magellan telescopes. Left are the OGLE project and du Pont telescope domes.

Image credit & copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)

distant-traveller:

Airglow, gegenschein, and Milky Way

As far as the eye could see, it was a dark night at Las Campanas Observatory in the southern Atacama desert of Chile. But near local midnight on April 11, this mosaic of 3 minute long exposures revealed a green, unusually intense, atmospheric airglow stretching over thin clouds. Unlike aurorae powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, the airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction, and found around the globe. The chemical energy is provided by the Sun’s extreme ultraviolet radiation. Like aurorae, the greenish hue of this airglow does originate at altitudes of 100 kilometers or so dominated by emission from excited oxygen atoms. The gegenschein, sunlight reflected by dust along the solar system’s ecliptic plane was still visible on that night, a faint bluish cloud just right of picture center. At the far right, the Milky Way seems to rise from the mountain top perch of the Magellan telescopes. Left are the OGLE project and du Pont telescope domes.

Image credit & copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)